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53 Favorite One-Hit Wonders of the 1970s

Updated on September 4, 2017
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FlourishAnyway believes there is a playlist for just about any situation and is on a mission to unite and entertain the world through song.

Make a 1970s throwback playlist featuring these favorite one-hit wonders from the era. A one-hit wonder is an artist who achieves success primarily for one song.
Make a 1970s throwback playlist featuring these favorite one-hit wonders from the era. A one-hit wonder is an artist who achieves success primarily for one song. | Source

'70s Flashback

I was a kid in the 1970s but remember the era like it was yesterday. Popular music ranged from mellow soft rock tunes to campy disco numbers to hard rock songs that have become classics.

Fashion included shag haircuts (had one and hated it), mood rings, clogs, gauchos, and lots of polyester. The decade exploded with color—both in fashion and in home decor. And if you can't recall harvest gold, avocado green, or pumpkin colored wallpaper, shag carpets, or appliances, you just weren't there.

As a nation, we endured Watergate, the energy crisis, and the Iranian hostage crisis. We celebrated America's bicentennial birthday and were wowed by the victories of Dorothy Hamill and Bruce (now Caitlyn) Jenner at the 1976 Olympics.

If you survived the thrill and challenges of 1970s, then see how many of the following one-hit wonders you remember. If you weren't born yet, then you missed out on the dynamite of disco and a momentous period in both culture and history. You can still get acquainted with the decade, however, by making yourself a '70s one-hit wonders playlist.

Reader Poll

What do you think of 1970s music?

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1. "I Love the Nightlife (Disco 'Round)" by Alicia Bridges

The narrator seeks to escape her relationship troubles in this 1978 disco hit, which reached #5 on the US Hot 100 Billboard charts. Rather than trying to fix her broken romance and address her lover's cheating directly, she wants to instead head to the dance floor to boogie the night away.

2. "Play That Funky Music" by Wild Cherry

Could you get by with this song today? Maybe not.

Wild Cherry was a rock band who reached the top spot on the US Billboard Hot 100 with this 1976 tune. It was inspired by a black audience member at one of their gigs who yelled to the group, "Play some funky music, white boy."

Based on that one-liner, one of the all-time most memorable rock song hooks of the decade (or longer) was born:

Play that funky music white boy
Play that funky music right
Play that funky music white boy
Lay down the boogie and play that funky music till you die.

Musical One-Hit Wonder

An artist who achieves mainstream success for a single song. ("Mainstream success" is often defined by a peak position in the top 40 of the US Billboard Hot 100). The musician may have had successful songs, however, on country, R&B, or other recognized music charts or in other countries.

3. "Ain't No Stoppin' Us Now McFadden & Whitehead

Double down on your personal motivation, 1970s style. If there have been things in your life holding you back, then kick them to the curb and get your groove on. Don't let anything hold you back or hold you down.

In 1979, this happening R&B crossover hit rose to #13 on the Billboard Hot 100.

4. "Layla" by Derek and the Dominos

Eric Clapton was a member of Derek and the Dominoes when he wrote this Grammy-winning song, released in 1971. The song was inspired by Clapton's relationship with Pattie Boyd, the wife of his friend, ex-Beatles member George Harrison.

The song's narrator is an interloper who begs the woman he loves to leave her lover. It reached #10 on the US Billboard Hot 100 charts and was among the 500 Greatest Songs of All Time, according to Rolling Stone magazine.

5. "Dancing in the Moonlight" by King Harvest

Climbing to #13 on the US Billboard Hot 100, this simple pop song from 1972 is about a group that gathers under the moonlight to dance together in peace and harmony.

Where were you in the 1970s, and what were you doing? Tell us in the Comments Section below.

6. "Love Hurts" by Nazareth

I found it humorous to watch singer Dan McCafferty in the video above. As he sings this power ballad, notice that his hand just rests on his hip. Talk about a lack of stage presence! The song itself, however, completely makes up for that.

The narrator in this 1975 rock classic is way too young to be as jaded as he is. Having fallen for the wrong girl, love has left him burned and bitter:

Love hurts
Love scars
Love wounds and marks
Any heart not tough or strong enough
To take a lot of pain, take a lot of pain ... .

The tune became an international hit for the Scottish rock band and peaked at #8 on the US Billboard Hot 100.

7. "Angel in Your Arms" by Hot

While this lady's lover slinks around town getting some side action, she wants him to know that she's not the fool he assumes she is. The gal tells him that two can play at this cheating game. (Oh, burn!)

The international country hit climbed to #6 on the US Billboard Hot 100 in 1977, also crossing over to R&B and other charts. And you probably thought Barbara Mandrell originated this hit, huh?

8. "Third Rate Romance" by Amazing Rhythm Aces

Cheap one-night stands. Forget the frills. That's what this 1975 country rock song is about.

A man and woman meet in a restaurant and decide not to play games. Decades before the Tinder app, these two strangers skip the niceties and just get down to what they both want from one another:

Third rate romance, low rent rendezvous,
Then he said, "You don't look like my type, but I guess you'll do."
Third rate romance, low rent rendezvous,
He said, "I'll tell you I love you, if you want me to."
Third rate romance, low rent rendezvous.

The ditty peaked at #14 on the Billboard Hot 100. When country music artist Sammy Kershaw recorded the song in 1994, he had Russell Smith, the song's writer and former Amazing Rhythm Aces group member, sing back-up vocals.

9. "The Hustle" by Van McCoy

In 1975, this disco song and the accompanying dance were international sensations. Despite winning a Grammy, the hit consists of exactly five words, repeated in slightly different combinations: Oh, do it, the hustle.

It's about the simplest set of song lyrics I've ever encountered in popular music. Were there slim pickins that year for Grammy songs? Just wondering. The tune topped the US Billboard Hot 100 charts. People still dance The Hustle today.

10. "Cat Scratch Fever" by Ted Nugent

So is this what's wrong with Ted Nugent?

Long before he was known for his ultraconservative, intolerant political rants, he was mouthing off this 1977 heavy metal treasure about what else but venereal disease. (In case you don't know, that's what folks used to call STDs back then.)

The most inappropriate part of the song is that the narrator indicates that his first encounter with "cat scratch fever" was when he was 10 years old. Only Ted Nugent could write a song like this. It topped out at #30 on the US Billboard Hot 100.

How Much Do You Remember About the 1970s?

 
 
 
Secretariat won the Triple Crown
The Beatles broke up
wide-collar shirts
"Charlie's Angels"
very wide bellbottoms
"All in the Family"
the Nerf ball
Watergate
Battle of the Sexes in tennis between Bobby Riggs and Billie Jean King
"Little House on the Prairie" television show
beanbag chairs
Bloody Sunday
fall of Saigon
cut-out swimsuits
very high, clunky heeled shoes
shiny clothes
"Saturday Night Live"
Skrinky Dinks
"The Godfather"
Terror at the 1972 Olympics
Holly Hobbie
energy crisis
"Star Wars"
pocket calculators
Margaret Thatcher became Britain's first female Prime Minister
Cambodian genocide
Elvis dies
"Roots"
disco fever
"Jaws"
pet rocks
Stretch Armstrong
the Jamestown massacre
latchkey kids
Big Wheels
Nixon becomes the first US President to visit China
the first test tube baby
Iranian hostage crisis
"M*A*S*H"

1970s American Presidential Throwback

Click thumbnail to view full-size
My husband's uncle was part of the White House Communications Office from Presidents Johnson through Bush. Pictured here is President Richard Nixon's 1972 visit to China, marking an important historical step in normalizing relations with the country.Following the resignation of President Richard Nixon, Gerald Ford became the 38th President of the United States.  He served from 1974-1977.  Also pictured here is his wife, First Lady Betty Ford.President Anwar Sadat of Egypt, President Jimmy Carter of the United States, and Prime Minister Menachem Begin of Israel,  met in 1978 for the Camp David Accords.
My husband's uncle was part of the White House Communications Office from Presidents Johnson through Bush. Pictured here is President Richard Nixon's 1972 visit to China, marking an important historical step in normalizing relations with the country.
My husband's uncle was part of the White House Communications Office from Presidents Johnson through Bush. Pictured here is President Richard Nixon's 1972 visit to China, marking an important historical step in normalizing relations with the country. | Source
Following the resignation of President Richard Nixon, Gerald Ford became the 38th President of the United States.  He served from 1974-1977.  Also pictured here is his wife, First Lady Betty Ford.
Following the resignation of President Richard Nixon, Gerald Ford became the 38th President of the United States. He served from 1974-1977. Also pictured here is his wife, First Lady Betty Ford. | Source
President Anwar Sadat of Egypt, President Jimmy Carter of the United States, and Prime Minister Menachem Begin of Israel,  met in 1978 for the Camp David Accords.
President Anwar Sadat of Egypt, President Jimmy Carter of the United States, and Prime Minister Menachem Begin of Israel, met in 1978 for the Camp David Accords. | Source

11. "Please Come to Boston" by Dave Loggins

This 1974 soft rock song describes a struggling singer who leaves both his home and the woman he loves in Tennessee to pursue his dreams. As he travels the country, from Boston to Denver to Los Angeles, he writes home to urge his girlfriend to come join him.

Each time, she declines:

There ain't no gold and there ain't nobody like me
I'm the number one fan of the man from Tennessee.

The song rose to #5 on the US Billboard Hot 100. The real kicker? Songwriter Dave Loggins said the tune was only semi-autobiographical, as there was actually no one waiting for him back in Tennessee. How lonely is that?

12. "Cruel to Be Kind" by Nick Lowe

In this 1979 rock song, the narrator is confused by the treatment his lover dishes out. When he asks for an explanation, she replies, "You've gotta be cruel to be kind." The phrase means that sometimes you have to cause someone temporary pain for their overall wellbeing. The hit peaked at #12 on the US Billboard Hot 100, making Nick Lowe a one-hit wonder.

Remember 8-Track Tapes?

Before the cassette tape, there was the 8-track tape. It was impossible to rewind.  This one appears in a 1978 American Motors Corporation Matador four-door sedan, shown here in the "play" position.  Groovy!
Before the cassette tape, there was the 8-track tape. It was impossible to rewind. This one appears in a 1978 American Motors Corporation Matador four-door sedan, shown here in the "play" position. Groovy! | Source

13. "Kung Fu Fighting" by Carl Douglas

Some of the lyrics in this disco hit wouldn't fly today (e.g., "They were funky China men from funky Chinatown"), but you have to remember that this was 1974. There was no political correctness.

The song was written in a hurry, recorded in just two takes, and was intended to be "side B." However, it wound up becoming one of the best-selling singles of all time, topping not only the US Billboard Hot 100 chart but also charts around the world.

You can still hear the song today in commercials as well as movies (e.g., animated Kung Fu Panda series).

14. "Afternoon Delight" by Starland Vocal Band

Many people say this 1976 song has a double entendre, or double meaning, as it alludes to "appetite" (sexual or gustatory). The song was inspired by the spicy late-afternoon appetizer menu at the restaurant Clyde's of Georgetown, in Washington, D.C.

I say, however, there's no hidden meaning at all; it's about as 70s horny as a song could get. The narrator wants to line up a little afternoon romp in the sack with his lover. (Not that there's anything wrong with that.)

The song reached #1 on the US Billboard Hot 100 and won the group a Grammy for Best New Artist. One particularly unusual use of the song was that it was CBS' theme song for their coverage of the Bicentennial Celebration, anchored by Dan Rather. Now that's just weird.

Remember Shag Carpet and Avocado Green?

What were people of the 1970s thinking?  Shag, or deep pile, carpets were ugly and came in colors that were even uglier.   This one is harvest gold and avocado green.   Classic 1970s!
What were people of the 1970s thinking? Shag, or deep pile, carpets were ugly and came in colors that were even uglier. This one is harvest gold and avocado green. Classic 1970s! | Source

15. "You Light Up My Life" by Debby Boone

The lonely lady in this 1977 pop song waited for a long time for love to arrive, and now that he's here she wants to remind him how special he is. Although by today's standards, I think the song seems clingy, it was a very popular wedding song back in the day.

The song climbed to the top spot on the US Billboard Hot 100 chart. Boone won a Grammy Award for it and was named Best New Artist, but her career peaked early. She was a one-hit wonder.

16. "(I Never Promised You a) Rose Garden" by Lynn Anderson

Crossing over from the country charts to climb to #3 on the US Billboard Hot 100, this Grammy Award-winning ditty became an international smash hit in 1970. It features a narrator who reminds her sweetheart that realistically, love consists of both sunshine and rain.

Remember Roller Disco?

In the 1970s, roller skating became popular and the roller disco was born.
In the 1970s, roller skating became popular and the roller disco was born. | Source

17. "What the World Needs Now Is Love (Abraham, Martin and John) by Tom Clay

This tune may be about four decades old, but it is as relevant today as it was back then.

The 1971 song is a remix of Jackie DeShannon's 1965 tune. The remix features a young boy describing what words like segregation, bigotry, hatred, and prejudice mean. (He doesn't know and thinks "it's when somebody's sick.")

Interspersed with DeShannon's lyrics are

  • soundbites of the Vietnam war
  • newscasts describing the assassinations of JFK and Bobby Kennedy
  • Teddy Kennedy's emotional eulogy for brother Bobby and
  • Martin Luther King Jr.'s "I "Have a Dream" speech.

The unique song peaked at #8 on the Billboard Hot 100.

18. "Just When I Needed You Most" by Randy VanWarmer

The epitome of heartbreak, this 1979 soft rock song paints a picture of a guy who mourns the loss of an important love relationship. He misses his partner but knows she's gone for good.

Although the narrator portrays her as a cold-hearted lady—someone who left him in the rain without closing the door—we all know that there are two sides to every heartbreak. Otherwise, abandoning someone when they needed you the most would be pretty brutal, right?

The song peaked at #4 on the U.S. Billboard Hot 100.

19. " Kiss an Angel Good Mornin'" by Charley Pride

Check out the smile on the narrator in this country ditty and ask him what his secret to happiness is. This is what he'll tell you:

You've got to kiss an angel good mornin'
And let her know you think about her when you're gone.
Kiss an angel good mornin'
And love her like a devil when you get back home.

If you were getting that much lovin', wouldn't you be upbeat and perky, too? The song went to the top of the country charts in 1971, then crossed over to the US Billboard Hot 100, where it climbed to #21.

20. "O-o-h Child" by Five Stairsteps

Wouldn't it be wonderful if during difficult times you had a soothing voice of experience to promise you that the future will be easier and brighter? Wouldn't it be perfect to have an assurance that your head with be lighter from less stress? Ahhhh. That's exactly what this mellow R&B crossover song does.

It peaked at #8 on the US Billboard Hot 100 in 1970. For good reason, it's ranked as one of Rolling Stone's 500 Greatest Songs of All Time. Groovy.

During the 1970s, millions of smiley face badges, coffee mugs, t-shirts, and other items were sold.  Often the phrase, "Have a nice day" was used in conjunction with the item.
During the 1970s, millions of smiley face badges, coffee mugs, t-shirts, and other items were sold. Often the phrase, "Have a nice day" was used in conjunction with the item. | Source

Even More Favorite One-Hit Wonders From the 1970s

Song
Artist
Year Released
21. (If Loving You Is Wrong) I Don't Want to Be Right
Barbara Mandrell
1979
22. Woman to Woman
Shirley Brown
1974
23. If You Want It
Niteflyte
1979
24. I Can't Stand the Rain
Ann Peebles
1974
25. I Can't Stand the Rain
Eruption
1977
26. The Night the Lights Went Out in Georgia
Vicki Lawrence
1972
27. Ring My Bell
Anita Ward
1979
28. All the Young Dudes
Mott the Hoople
1972
29. Love Is in the Air
John Paul Young
1977
30. Got to be Real
Cheryl Lynn
1978
31. Lovin' You
Minnie Riperton
1975
32. Tell Me a Lie
Sami Jo
1974
33. Lizzie and the Rainman
Tanya Tucker
1975
34. Feelings
Morris Albert
1975
35. The Boys Are Back in Town
Thin Lizzy
1976
36. Here Comes the Sun
Richie Havens
1971
37. I'm Not Lisa
Jessi Colter
1975
38. Born to Be Alive
Patrick Hernandez
1979
39. Teddy Bear
Red Sovine
1976
40. Don't Give Up on Us
David Soul
1976
41. In the Midnight Hour
Cross Country
1973
42. I'd Like to Teach the World to Sing (In Perfect Harmony)
The Hillside Singers
1971
43. She's All I Got
Freddie North
1971
44. Fooled Around and Fell in Love
Elvin Bishop
1976
45. I've Got the Music in Me
The Kiki Dee Band
1974
46. More, More, More
The Andrea True Connection
1976
47. If We Make It Through December
Merle Haggard
1973
48. Short People
Randy Newman
1977
49. Turn the Beat Around
Vicki Sue Robinson
1976
50. Hot Rod Lincoln
Commander Cody And His Lost Planet Airmen
1971
51. How Long?
Ace
1974
52. Welcome Back
John Sebastian
1976
53. I've Got the Music in Me
The Kiki Dee Band
1974
Have a favorite one-hit wonder from the 1970s that should be on this playlist? Make a suggestion in the Comments Section below.

What's in a Name? Locations with Names Associated with the 1970s

show route and directions
A markerBogart, Georgia, USA -
Bogart, GA 30622, USA
get directions

"Bogart" was a term that mean don't hog something; share it.

B markerDance, Nevada, USA -
Dance, Nevada, USA
get directions

C markerDisco, Wisconsin, USA -
Disco, WI 54642, USA
get directions

D markerDynamite Point, Missouri, USA -
Dynamite Point, Shell Knob, MO 65747, USA
get directions

"Dyn-o-mite" was a term popularized by "Good Times" actor Jimmie Walker

E markerFreedom, Indiana, USA -
Freedom, IN 47431, USA
get directions

America celebrated its 200th birthday on July 4, 1976

F markerHustle, Virginia, USA -
Hustle, VA 22476, USA
get directions

The hustle was a popular dance in the 1970s.

G markerNixon, Texas, USA -
Nixon, TX 78140, USA
get directions

H markerShag Lake, Michigan, USA -
Shag Lake, Forsyth Township, MI 49841, USA
get directions

In the 1970s, there were shag haircuts, shag carpets, and slang references to "shagging" (meaning having sex).

I markerSmiley, Texas, USA -
Smiley, TX, USA
get directions

J markerThatcher, Arizona, USA -
Thatcher, AZ, USA
get directions

© 2017 FlourishAnyway

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    • FlourishAnyway profile image
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      FlourishAnyway 2 days ago from USA

      Debangee - I appreciate your kind comment. I like the throwback tunes as well. Have a great week!

    • Debangee Mandal profile image

      DEBANGEE MANDAL 2 days ago from India

      Many beautiful, evergreen and talented pieces have been composed this time. I love music , specially these old classics.

      So, thank you for sharing this wonderful collection of songs.

    • FlourishAnyway profile image
      Author

      FlourishAnyway 5 days ago from USA

      Dianna - My husband reminded me of an an 1980s saying: "Death before disco." However, given time, we all appreciate the music we grew up with.

    • teaches12345 profile image

      Dianna Mendez 6 days ago

      Who doesn't like the 70's music? I am still hearing that Funky tune!

    • FlourishAnyway profile image
      Author

      FlourishAnyway 8 days ago from USA

      Chris - We definitely have that in common! Thanks for stopping by!

    • Chriswillman90 profile image

      Krzysztof Willman 9 days ago from Parlin, New Jersey

      I love older music and the 70s is one of the my favorite decades so thank you for sharing this list.

    • FlourishAnyway profile image
      Author

      FlourishAnyway 12 days ago from USA

      Devika - Thanks for sharing a bit about your love of the 1970s.

    • profile image

      DDE 12 days ago

      Music from my time sounds great. I often listen to this music to remember how much younger I was and enjoyed listening then as I do now.

    • FlourishAnyway profile image
      Author

      FlourishAnyway 2 weeks ago from USA

      James - You've provided a stellar rundown of a decade that many people don't give enough credit to culturally. It was disco, yes, but so much more! Thanks for that fabulous "best of" music review ... quite a trip down memory lane!

    • justthemessenger profile image

      James C Moore 2 weeks ago from The Great Midwest

      You've outdone yourself this time. The 70's, the undisputed best ever time for music, all music. This decade produced 'Devil Went Down to Georgia' (Charlie Daniels Band-Country Western) and 'Freebird' the air guitar anthem by Lynrd Skynrd. Also, the Hawkins singers gospel classic'Oh Happy Day' featured prominently in the '70s. James Brown, the Jackson 5, Parliament Funkedelics and the remainder of the world's best R&B sounds helped the 7-0 decade the music decade. And quiet as it's kept, rap (with the Sugar Hill Gang) entered the mainstream along with the late great Prince who debuted in the '70s.

    • FlourishAnyway profile image
      Author

      FlourishAnyway 2 weeks ago from USA

      Linda - Thanks for stopping by. It's nice to relive the past, but I sure wouldn't want to live there again! For all of our modern problems, I like now too much.

    • AliciaC profile image

      Linda Crampton 2 weeks ago from British Columbia, Canada

      This is an interesting article with respect to both music and history. I enjoyed the entertainment, the education, and the memories. Thanks, Flourish.

    • FlourishAnyway profile image
      Author

      FlourishAnyway 2 weeks ago from USA

      Dora - Thank you for sharing your 70s memories! Have a wonderful week!

    • MsDora profile image

      Dora Isaac Weithers 2 weeks ago from The Caribbean

      I remember "You Light Up My Life." Gained personal independence in the 70s--perhaps a bit late by some standards. Those were still the "good ole days."

    • FlourishAnyway profile image
      Author

      FlourishAnyway 2 weeks ago from USA

      Nadine - She hit #8 with the Goldfinger theme song but that was in 1964, and in the 1970s she had a couple of songs that just missed the Top 40 on the US Billboard Hot 100 charts. She had better success, however, in the UK. It's hard to understand sometimes why musicians make it in one country but not another. Thanks for stopping by!

    • FlourishAnyway profile image
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      FlourishAnyway 2 weeks ago from USA

      Larry - I completely agree. The one song he's known for is nasty, and so is he. What a waste. I wish the media would ignore people like that instead of giving them a sexist, racist, hating platform to spread their garbage.

    • FlourishAnyway profile image
      Author

      FlourishAnyway 2 weeks ago from USA

      Rasma - Thanks for sharing your memories! Have a groovy week!

    • Gypsy Rose Lee profile image

      Gypsy Rose Lee 2 weeks ago from Riga, Latvia

      Thank you so much for the awesome memories of the 70s. That was my high school time. SIGH..... Still love that music and play it when nostalgia hits.

    • Larry Rankin profile image

      Larry Rankin 2 weeks ago from Oklahoma

      Ted Nugent has one song that, as far as one hit wonders goes, really isn't that good. What keeps him in the news all these years?

      Being a racist jerk. Just saying, lol.

      Love the one hit lists.

    • Nadine May profile image

      Nadine May 2 weeks ago from Cape Town, Western Cape, South Africa

      Yes, I remember Little House on the Prairie and "M*A*S*H" That the Beatles broke up and the Rolling Stones but I missed seeing the Welsh singer Shirley Bassey mentioned. I loved her songs. Great post.

    • FlourishAnyway profile image
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      FlourishAnyway 2 weeks ago from USA

      Jo - Thanks for sharing where you were and what you were doing. Have a great week!

    • FlourishAnyway profile image
      Author

      FlourishAnyway 2 weeks ago from USA

      Tamara - Glad you enjoyed these throwback songs! Have a wonderful week!

    • FlourishAnyway profile image
      Author

      FlourishAnyway 2 weeks ago from USA

      Demas - Thanks for the kudos! Hope your week is far out.

    • jo miller profile image

      Jo Miller 2 weeks ago from Tennessee

      I was mainly birthing babies in the 70's. As a 60's person, I was never very fond of the music of the 70's, but I do remember a few of these.

    • profile image

      Tamara Moore 2 weeks ago

      Very much love the 70' songs! I am going to add a few of these to my Playlist, in fact. Groovy!

    • Perspycacious profile image

      Demas W Jasper 2 weeks ago from Today's America and The World Beyond

      What an outstanding "flashback". You rock, gal!

    • FlourishAnyway profile image
      Author

      FlourishAnyway 2 weeks ago from USA

      Audrey - Thanks for sharing your love of the '70s! I loved the disco craze. Have a great Labor Day!

    • vocalcoach profile image

      Audrey Hunt 2 weeks ago from Nashville Tn.

      Now you're talking! My era is the 70's and just today I found a radio station playing all 70's music. Oh yeah! "I love the night life" found me out on the dance floor and what memories they do bring.

      Thank you for this joy!

    • FlourishAnyway profile image
      Author

      FlourishAnyway 2 weeks ago from USA

      Heidi - Marcia! Marcia! Marcia! I loved the Brady Bunch, Fantasy Island, Love Boat, Soul Train, and the movie Grease. I can still hear some of the theme songs in my head. Thanks for sharing even more fun memories! It's hard to believe it was so long ago. Have a groovy Labor Day weekend, you dig?

    • FlourishAnyway profile image
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      FlourishAnyway 2 weeks ago from USA

      Bill - You know what they say about if a hammer is the only thing in your toolbox, then everything starts looking like a nail. That's so funny that they played their one hit over and over. I guess that's why people were there, huh? Thanks for stopping by! Have a groovy Labor Day weekend.

    • billybuc profile image

      Bill Holland 2 weeks ago from Olympia, WA

      Did you ever wonder what those "one hit wonders" did at concerts? If they only had one hit, how did they manage to play an hour show? LOL Just keep playing the same song over and over again? I actually saw the Kingsman back in, gosh, early 60s maybe? They played Louie Louie twelve times at that performance. :)

    • heidithorne profile image

      Heidi Thorne 2 weeks ago from Chicago Area

      Far out! I loved the 70s music (and 80s, as you know). Many of these tunes STILL run through my head. And "Dancin' in the Moonlight" was in the recent "The Hitman's Bodyguard" movie. So that's been an earworm since last week for me.

      What was I doing in the 70s? High school. Other stuff I remember from the 70s:

      * The Brady Bunch (although it started in the fall of 1969 and ran through 1974). Talk about funky clothes. They had 'em! Their one-hit wonder theme song still lives on. And weren't you curious as to why the TV stations in Bradyland always wanted them on a show? More one-hit wonders with "Sunshine Day," "Good Time Music," and "Time to Change."

      * Soul Train. Started here in Chi-town, showcasing some of the greatest funk and disco acts of the era.

      * The Love Boat. Boarding in 1977, another one-hit theme song that lots of us still remember.

      * Saturday Night Fever. Can't believe it's celebrating it's 40th anniversary this December!

      Okay, gotta dig out my 8-track. Peace, man!

    • FlourishAnyway profile image
      Author

      FlourishAnyway 2 weeks ago from USA

      Bob - I do remember that. And if for some reason they didn't find your tiny Visa or MasterCharge (at that time) number, they'd have to call somewhere or switch books (for the most up-to-date one). Your science teacher must have had a crystal ball. Just imagine what the future holds now.

    • Bob Bamberg profile image

      Bob Bamberg 2 weeks ago from Southeastern Massachusetts

      You mentioning credit cards, FlourishAnyway, and that jogged another memory. Remember when you paid with a credit card the cashier had this little book with tissue paper pages and columns upon columns of little, really little, 16-digit numbers that they'd have to check your card against to make sure it was good? Also, ATM cards were introduced then and a lot of people didn't trust them...and didn't trust getting cash from the machine after dark for fear of getting konked on the head and robbed.

      I remember being in the 7th grade...1959...and our science teacher told us that someday, we wouldn't even have to carry money around. We'd all have little plastic cards that contained our banking information and we'd use those instead. We all thought he was crazy!

    • FlourishAnyway profile image
      Author

      FlourishAnyway 2 weeks ago from USA

      Linda - I don't wish to go back either, particularly given where women stood with civil rights, getting their own credit cards, etc. We still have more progress to make. Thanks for sharing your memories!

    • FlourishAnyway profile image
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      FlourishAnyway 2 weeks ago from USA

      Bob - Thanks for sharing your memories. I remember Datsuns, too! My family had one in an unusually yellow/orange that had a very long life. It racked up almost 300,000 miles before it went to the graveyard because we couldn't get parts for it any longer.

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      Linda Lum 2 weeks ago from Washington State, USA

      Oh my goodness, I remember each and every one of these. I'm admitting my age, but I was already an adult in the working world in the 70's. The styles were hideous, and the decor looked like Halloween 12 months of the year. The songs are fun, but I'm not yearning for a reset button to go back to that time in our history.

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      Bob Bamberg 2 weeks ago from Southeastern Massachusetts

      We bought the kids an Apple IIc computer and a Colecovision game system in the 70's, and that was pretty high tech... especially the Colecovision. When I bought it, they were offering a college scholarship, I think it was $100. I filled out the paperwork. By the time my oldest son was ready for college in 1990, Colecovision was long gone, but when I submitted the voucher, I got a check. They must have established some sort of a trust fund for it.

      In the 70's, we had no Cable TV...that came to the Boston area in the early 80's. I had a new 1972 Datsun, which is now Nissan. It was always Nissan Motors, but the auto brand was Datsun back then.

      Gas reached $1 a gallon to everyone's outrage, especially when gas was rationed. Depending on whether the last number of your license plate was odd or even, you could get your gas on odd or even days.

      There were no cell phones, although there was a wireless model that you could use within a hundred feet of the base station, which was plugged into an electrical outlet.

      There were no reality shows or 24 hour news channels, and some shows were still being produced in B&W.

      Your kids could safely leave the yard by themselves, cigarettes were 65 cents a pack, hamburger was 89 cents a pound, and I was entering middle age.

      I was a broadcaster in local radio and played every one of those songs you listed. I especially liked Layla... but didn't care for Clapton's unplugged version in the 90's. That was hard to get used to. Thanks for the trip down memory lane. Fun hub.