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Amateur Night on Beale Street and Careers Launched There

Updated on November 2, 2017
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Robert Odell Jr is the senior video editor of the independent film, Take Me Back To Beale, a chronicle of 100 years of Beale Street history.

At First, the King and B.B. King Performed as Amateurs

From 1935 to the 1970's Amateur Night on Beale Street was the place for  every entertainer, with a dream, to perform.  If you could survive the harsh, unsympathetic crowds, as these two fellows did, you were destined for stardom.
From 1935 to the 1970's Amateur Night on Beale Street was the place for every entertainer, with a dream, to perform. If you could survive the harsh, unsympathetic crowds, as these two fellows did, you were destined for stardom. | Source

A young man who became "The King" and another young man who became "B.B. King" both survived one of the most cruel and unsympathetic crowds in the history of entertainment. If any entertainer could survive a showing at Amateur Night on Beale Street, they were then in the running to receive a one-way ticket to stardom.

Amateur Night at the Palace

Amateur Night at the Palace Theater on Beale Street was a well attended, festive occasion. The majority black, Beale Street patrons, stayed on the street day and night 24/7.

Amateur Night on Beale attracted large crowds. During the "hay-day" of Beale Street, if you had asked a black man to describe Memphis he would have said Beale Street. To the black man, Beale Street was Memphis and Amateur Night on Beale was an important part of it.

Beale Street Was Memphis

Amateur Night at the Palace Theater and Beale Street had constant patrons; mostly black.
Amateur Night at the Palace Theater and Beale Street had constant patrons; mostly black. | Source

Patrons Loved Amateur Night

During the "hay-day" of Beale Street, if you had asked a black man to describe Memphis he would have said Beale Street and Amateur Night on Beale were important parts of it.

A Big Break for Survivors

Starting in 1935, Amateur Night on Beale was considered by many, to be the biggest Beale Street talent show in the world. Held at the Palace Theater, the show attracted every "dream filled hopeful" looking for a big break.

Magicians, acrobats, jugglers comedians, one-man bands and any other talent you could name all came to Amateur Night on Beale, star-struck and looking for that "big break".

Looking for a Big Break

Every "dream filled hopeful", like this one-man band, came to Amateur Night on Beale Street looking for a big break.
Every "dream filled hopeful", like this one-man band, came to Amateur Night on Beale Street looking for a big break. | Source

Hungry, Pleasure-Seeking Audience

If the unfortunate talent that flooded the Amateur Night stage was not pleasing to the hungry, pleasure seeking audience, that talent would encounter anything and everything being thrown at them.

The crowd would "boo" persistently. It wasn't unusual for a weary reject to get popped in the face with a large paper ball.

Even worse than being gonged or hearing the roar of; "...get off the stage...", was the act of being shot at. Often, a one time firing from a thunderous, blank pistol would due. However; extremely terrible amateurs had the unfortunate consequence of being shot several times before being chased off of the stage in humiliation.

The Crowd Showed No Mercy

If the unfortunate talent that flooded the Amateur Night stage was not pleasing to the hungry, pleasure-seeking audience, that talent would encounter anything and everything being thrown their way.

Amateur Night on Beale Began in 1935

Nat D. Williams started Amateur Night on Beale in 1935.

Nat D. Williams:

  • Was the first black radio announcer in Memphis
  • Began broadcasting for the Memphis WDIA radio station in 1948
  • Wrote for a Memphis newspaper from 1928 until the early 1970s
  • Taught at Booker T. Washington High School in Memphis for 42 years
  • Was co-founder of the Cotton Makers Jubilee on Beale Street in Memphis
  • Was the announcer / MC for Amateur Night on Beale at the Palace Theater

The excitement of Nat D. Williams and Amateur Night on Beale is reenacted in a docudrama about the history of Beale Street.

Amateur Night on Beale Street

Nat D. Williams Was the Host of Amateur Night on Beale

Nat D. Williams began Amateur Night on Beale in 1935 at the Palace Theater.
Nat D. Williams began Amateur Night on Beale in 1935 at the Palace Theater. | Source

According to "The Memphis Music Hall of Fame": Nat D. Williams

  • Received his bachelor’s and master’s degrees in Nashville at historically black colleges
  • After returning to Memphis, took on a teaching job, in 1930, at Booker T. Washington High School in South Memphis


Nat D. Williams taught at Booker T. Washington High School for four decades. While there he:

  • Taught history and social studies
  • Edited the school paper
  • Trained the pep squad
  • Assisted with senior speeches
  • Saw many of his students go on to serve in the state legislature. (One, Judge Benjamin Hooks, became national chairman of the NAACP.)

Amateur Night Host and Educator

Did you know that Judge Benjamin Hooks, who became the national chairman of the NAACP, was a student of the Amateur Night on Beale host, Nat D. Williams?

See results

Many Started Dirt Poor

Many entertainers who became rich and famous started dirt poor, performing at Amateur Night on Beale.

Among those were; Elvis Aaron Presley (aka "The King") and Riley "Blues Boy" King (aka B.B. King), both of whom survived the ruthless crowds of Amateur Night on Beale.

Elvis Aaron Presley (aka "The King") and Riley "Blues Boy" King (aka B.B. King), both survived the ruthless crowds of Amateur Night on Beale.

Two Young Survivors

A young man named Elvis and a young man named Riley King were both survivors of Amateur Night On Beale
A young man named Elvis and a young man named Riley King were both survivors of Amateur Night On Beale

Winners Were Chosen by Audience Applause

The contestants who were not booed and chased off of the stage were paraded back at the end of the show so the winners could be established by audience applause.

In a 1937 Scribner's Magazine article writer Virgil Fulling, who attended a show stated, "...the Amateurs came forward to determine by audience applause the winner of first place."

The winner of the show received $3.00 and the second place winner received a $2.00 prize.

On one occasion the winner of the fastest inner-tube tire pumper contest received a $5.00 prize. It was very easy to identify the winner of the contest after his tire burst in an earth shacking explosion.

As time went on, all participants who survived Amateur Night received $1.00.

Amateur Night on Beale Winners Received Monetary Prizes

Winner
Prize
First Place
$3.00
Second Place
$2.00
Participation
$1.00
Special Contest Winners
$5.00
The Winners Of Amateur Night On Beale Received Monetary Prizes

The Real Prize Was a Big Break

From 1935 to the 1970's, Amateur Night on Beale Street was the place where every entertainer, with a dream, could come and sharpen their talents. If you could survive the harsh, unsympathetic crowds, you were destined for stardom.

It was often stated that if you could make it on Amateur Night, you could make it anywhere. Many entertainers considered Amateur Night to be the "big break" that they needed.

One to five dollars may have been a lot of money when Amateur Night on Beale first got started. However; the real prize was the coveted "big break."

A young man named Elvis and a young guitar, blues player named Riley King both survived the harsh crowds and were rewarded with one "big break" each.

The Palace Theater Housed Amateur Night on Beale

A young man named Elvis and a young blues, guitar player named Riley King each received a "big break" after performing at Amateur Night on Beale at the Palace Theater.
A young man named Elvis and a young blues, guitar player named Riley King each received a "big break" after performing at Amateur Night on Beale at the Palace Theater. | Source

© 2015 Robert Odell Jr

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    • Muchsuccess profile image
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      Robert Odell Jr 4 months ago from Memphis, Tennessee

      Thank you very much. Memphis has a colorful history and I am pleased to know that you enjoyed reading about it.

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      Carolyn Yancy 5 months ago

      I thoroughly enjoyed reading your Hub. Excellent, creative work, as always, your trademark.

    • Muchsuccess profile image
      Author

      Robert Odell Jr 2 years ago from Memphis, Tennessee

      Thank you for your comment. I am happy that you enjoyed the Hub and the tidbit of Memphis, Beale Street history.

    • Patty Inglish, MS profile image

      Patty Inglish 2 years ago from North America

      That is a perfect leading photo to the Hub! - Seeing BB King so young makes me realize how old Elvis would be if he were living today, more so than just the number "80."